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English 102 - Mike Davros - Summer 2021

Welcome!

Welcome!  

Since we can't meet in person, think of this guide as your visit to the library during your class time to learn how to research.  Plan to work your way through each page, watching videos, reading, and at times completing small activities. 

The pages go in order. Your assignment is listed below, and subsequent pages give information on finding a topic, book or article.  Then, you will learn about evaluating resources and citations in MLA

At any point, if you have questions, please check the "Ask the Librarian" tab (to your left if you're on a computer, or up above if you're on a phone) for my contact information or to post a question.

Please click here to complete this BRIEF (4 question) survey after navigating the guide.

Thank you and Good Luck,

Gwyneth Stupar 

Your Assignment

EGL 102  FINAL RESEARCH PAPER:  ARGUMENTATIVE OR PERSUASIVE ESSAY

Draft due:                         in class for peer review.  2 letter grade deduction if no draft is submitted.

Paper due:                       in class,  Documentation style:  MLA form

Length requirements: 9-10 pages, minimum, typed, double spaced

All students must have the instructor’s prior approval of topics before research begins.

Argumentative, persuasive or mediating (Rogerian) essay: 9-10 pages, minimum with ten sources.  The paper represents your best work in the course.  Persuasive and argumentative essays sway audiences to adopt the point of view of the writer or to take a certain course of action.  Evidence, persuasive appeals, and logical argumentation assist your audience to side with you or to reach a compromise.

Use the sources available on your topic that you have discovered in the research and composition that you have done over the course of the semester.  At this point in your writing, you take a position, argue a thesis, and present reasons based upon evidence. In the process of presenting evidence, you make persuasive appeals or mediate a position between opposing sides.  Throughout the writing process, you navigate paths through a variety of viewpoints to arrive at your own.  In the initial draft of the essay, you might arrive at a discovery draft, and you discover your thesis.  In subsequent drafts of the essay, this thesis is foregrounded and usually stated early in the essay.

Whether you write an argumentative or mediating essay, evaluate forms of appeal: the appeal to reason (logos), the appeal to character (ethos), the appeal to emotion (pathos), the appeal through style.  If you write a mediatory essay, notice the negotiations that you have to make.  That is, if you write a mediatory essay, you need to know the positions that you’re mediating.  Your analyses will need to locate areas of disagreements about facts, interests, assumptions, principles, priorities, and so forth.  What is the source of conflict and how can it be resolved?  Propose a solution to the dispute.

This paper will be your most sophisticated writing to date in terms of the complexities of argument.  I see this paper as the working out of a case that your readers can believe in and act upon.  At this point in your research, I would expect you to have a firm grasp on the topic.  Your paper will navigate the spaces of disagreements among sources, and it will either defend a position or provide a balance or compromise. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the sources making an argument on your topic.  Working out a model of evaluation of each of your sources, you will have satisfied a substantial portion of the work towards which the course guides you.  You do not have to work out the evaluations of each argument on paper, but if you do, you will certainly be ahead of people who don’t.  You will also have a better understanding of how to attack conflicting claims.  Your abilities in questioning and reasoning, and the analytical skills you’ve built over the course of the semester will sustain your work.

Purposes: 1) To argue for a particular position, 2) To persuade a reader to act, or 3) to mediate the disagreement of an argument.

Audience: Analyze your audience.  While the audience may be largely academic, it would be a mistake to think that the audience is limited to the instructor.  Your audience may be hostile but in need of repair, an audience composed of the academic community at NEIU or Oakton, or anyone who can benefit from your point of view on this topic. Consider age, race, gender, class, education.  As you consider the audience, question how much they might already know about your topic.  How much do you need to explain?  Checklists, available in the text, will be especially helpful as you conceive of similar papers for other courses.

Responsible use of sources:  In this paper, you will be expected to demonstrate your ability to use MLA documentation.  Remember that you might have to weed through many sources to get to the required minimum of ten.  When you write about people, events, or ideas that you’ve read about, you need to tell your readers where you found the information.  Does it matter whether your source is The National Enquirer, Sports Illustrated, or a refereed journal? Part of the challenge is to show you can manage a variety of sources.  Your final list of sources, the Works Cited page, must reflect variety.  That is, a paper that can only be supported with evidence from websites is not as prized as a paper that demonstrates an ability to manage scholarly articles, books, non-text sources, and others.  Consequently, the grade for a paper with only websites in the Works Cited will be considerably lower than papers that demonstrate variety.

a) Cite your sources.  In your text, introduce another author’s words or ideas by using a tag or signal phrase (for example, “According to Welty…” or “Rubin concluded that…”).  Give the page number of the passage in parentheses and the name of the author if you did not mention it before.  Papers need to be consistent with MLA documentation format.  (See also Rules for Writers or The Bedford Handbook to guide you.)

b) Quote, paraphrase, or summarize other authors’ words according to your need in introducing them.

c)  On a “Works Cited” page, list all sources cited.  The list is arranged in alphabetical order, and complete bibliographical information for each source must be shown.  Prune URLs to a manageable size. When in doubt, consult Rules for Writers or The Bedford Handbook.  Software is available to manage this list, and MLA exists in a form online that will assist you.  Sample papers and samples of Works Cited pages are printed in the handbook.

d) Sources, essays, or articles in our texts may be used, but sources are not limited to books or articles in print.  Many sources may come to mind, but here’s a short list by way of example:

*books (novels will also qualify for usage and analysis, short stories, drama)

*articles from popular magazines (Time, Newsweek, or similar publications) or newspapers

*articles from academic or professional journals

*non-textual sources: interviews, television programs, lectures, sound and film recordings, advertising

*electronic sources: the myriad of possibilities through the internet (blogs, YouTube, etc.)

ENGL 102 or EGL 102  FINAL RESEARCH PAPER:  ARGUMENTATIVE OR PERSUASIVE ESSAY

Draft due:                         in class for peer review.  2 letter grade deduction if no draft is submitted.

Paper due:                       in class,  Documentation style:  MLA form

Length requirements: 9-10 pages, minimum, typed, double spaced

All students must have the instructor’s prior approval of topics before research begins.

Argumentative, persuasive or mediating (Rogerian) essay: 9-10 pages, minimum with ten sources.  The paper represents your best work in the course.  Persuasive and argumentative essays sway audiences to adopt the point of view of the writer or to take a certain course of action.  Evidence, persuasive appeals, and logical argumentation assist your audience to side with you or to reach a compromise.

Use the sources available on your topic that you have discovered in the research and composition that you have done over the course of the semester.  At this point in your writing, you take a position, argue a thesis, and present reasons based upon evidence. In the process of presenting evidence, you make persuasive appeals or mediate a position between opposing sides.  Throughout the writing process, you navigate paths through a variety of viewpoints to arrive at your own.  In the initial draft of the essay, you might arrive at a discovery draft, and you discover your thesis.  In subsequent drafts of the essay, this thesis is foregrounded and usually stated early in the essay.

Whether you write an argumentative or mediating essay, evaluate forms of appeal: the appeal to reason (logos), the appeal to character (ethos), the appeal to emotion (pathos), the appeal through style.  If you write a mediatory essay, notice the negotiations that you have to make.  That is, if you write a mediatory essay, you need to know the positions that you’re mediating.  Your analyses will need to locate areas of disagreements about facts, interests, assumptions, principles, priorities, and so forth.  What is the source of conflict and how can it be resolved?  Propose a solution to the dispute.

This paper will be your most sophisticated writing to date in terms of the complexities of argument.  I see this paper as the working out of a case that your readers can believe in and act upon.  At this point in your research, I would expect you to have a firm grasp on the topic.  Your paper will navigate the spaces of disagreements among sources, and it will either defend a position or provide a balance or compromise. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the sources making an argument on your topic.  Working out a model of evaluation of each of your sources, you will have satisfied a substantial portion of the work towards which the course guides you.  You do not have to work out the evaluations of each argument on paper, but if you do, you will certainly be ahead of people who don’t.  You will also have a better understanding of how to attack conflicting claims.  Your abilities in questioning and reasoning, and the analytical skills you’ve built over the course of the semester will sustain your work.

Purposes: 1) To argue for a particular position, 2) To persuade a reader to act, or 3) to mediate the disagreement of an argument.

Audience: Analyze your audience.  While the audience may be largely academic, it would be a mistake to think that the audience is limited to the instructor.  Your audience may be hostile but in need of repair, an audience composed of the academic community at NEIU or Oakton, or anyone who can benefit from your point of view on this topic. Consider age, race, gender, class, education.  As you consider the audience, question how much they might already know about your topic.  How much do you need to explain?  Checklists, available in the text, will be especially helpful as you conceive of similar papers for other courses.

Responsible use of sources:  In this paper, you will be expected to demonstrate your ability to use MLA documentation.  Remember that you might have to weed through many sources to get to the required minimum of ten.  When you write about people, events, or ideas that you’ve read about, you need to tell your readers where you found the information.  Does it matter whether your source is The National Enquirer, Sports Illustrated, or a refereed journal? Part of the challenge is to show you can manage a variety of sources.  Your final list of sources, the Works Cited page, must reflect variety.  That is, a paper that can only be supported with evidence from websites is not as prized as a paper that demonstrates an ability to manage scholarly articles, books, non-text sources, and others.  Consequently, the grade for a paper with only websites in the Works Cited will be considerably lower than papers that demonstrate variety.

a) Cite your sources.  In your text, introduce another author’s words or ideas by using a tag or signal phrase (for example, “According to Welty…” or “Rubin concluded that…”).  Give the page number of the passage in parentheses and the name of the author if you did not mention it before.  Papers need to be consistent with MLA documentation format.  (See also Rules for Writers or The Bedford Handbook to guide you.)

b) Quote, paraphrase, or summarize other authors’ words according to your need in introducing them.

c)  On a “Works Cited” page, list all sources cited.  The list is arranged in alphabetical order, and complete bibliographical information for each source must be shown.  Prune URLs to a manageable size. When in doubt, consult Rules for Writers or The Bedford Handbook.  Software is available to manage this list, and MLA exists in a form online that will assist you.  Sample papers and samples of Works Cited pages are printed in the handbook.

d) Sources, essays, or articles in our texts may be used, but sources are not limited to books or articles in print.  Many sources may come to mind, but here’s a short list by way of example:

*books (novels will also qualify for usage and analysis, short stories, drama)

*articles from popular magazines (Time, Newsweek, or similar publications) or newspapers

*articles from academic or professional journals

*non-textual sources: interviews, television programs, lectures, sound and film recordings, advertising

*electronic sources: the myriad of possibilities through the internet (blogs, YouTube, etc.)