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EGL 102 - Steve Monk - Spring 2022

Examples of MLA Citations and Sample Works Cited Page - 8th Edition

NoodleTools

NoodleTools

NoodleTools is a full featured citation and research tool that will help you format and save your citations online.  It can help you through the citation process step by step.  It can also help you create and manage an outline and/or notecards for your paper, and can help you share your sources with other users.

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March 24, 2020 Update -- please note the following changes:

NoodleTools has changed their account registration process to support remote teaching. Students no longer have to be on campus to create an account. When you connect to Noodletools with the link provided below, you will be prompted for your Oakton username and password (same as used for D2L and MyOakton).  Your next step depends on whether you are a returning user or a new user:

 

When to use In Text Citations

What should be documented?
Your essay or paper needs to have evidence, or support, or proof of the points you are making. The main evidence you use in a literature essay comes in the form of ideas or words from the text you are analyzing. Below is a list of the situations where you should acknowledge the sources of information you use.

A) WHEN QUOTING: if you quote an author's exact words

Walker states that "womanist is to feminist as purple is to lavender," but does not stop at defining herself as a feminist (173).


B) WHEN PARAPHRASING: if you use your own words, but you use another author's ideas.

The aristocratic heroic and kinship values of Germanic society continued to inspire both clergy and laity during Christian times (Smith 323)

 

C) WHEN SUMMARIZING: if you summarize one or more points in another author's writing.

The Renaissance was seen as a time of upheaval of traditional art forms and societal values, paving the way for a more enlightened and broad view of the foreign world (Rahemtulla 988).


D) STATISTICS OR FACTS: if you use a fact or a statistic that is not common knowledge.

The Dutch Crown’s overseas territories were vastly increased in 1667 (Charland 301).

 

Klassen, C., J. Robinson and  M. Stainsby. "In Text Citation Using MLA Style." Douglas College. Douglas College. 2012. Web.  22 July 2015.