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Cite It Right - Quick Guide for Citations

Why Do I Need to Use Citations?

A citation is reliable way to lead your reader back to the materials you used in your research.

A citation gives credit to an author for their research, writings and ideas.

 

When you use citations you are

  • showing that you know how to use information well,
  • creating credibility for your paper by providing good quality sources and good quality citations for them.
  • giving credit to the authors of material you used,
  • avoiding plagiarism,
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The Basics - Every Citation Needs This Information

What do I include in a citation?

MLA requires as much of the following information as possible:
      Author's name
      Title of the work
      Title of the website
      Name of the website sponsor
      Date of the most recent update
      URL - web address
      Date of access (or the date you looked at the website)

APA requires as much of the following information as possible:
      Author's name
      Date of publication or update
      Title of the source
      URL   or
      DOI - Digital Object Identifier  - for online newspaper, magazine or journal articles.

CMS or Chicago Manual of Style requires as much of the following information as possible:
      Author's name
      Title of the work
      Title of the source
      Date of publication or update
      URL

A URL or web address is not enough information for a citation in any paper or project.
Sometimes a URL will lead to a dead link so more details about your source are needed.  

What Do Citations Look Like?

Here are examples of a book citation in

MLA:

End text reference:

English, Darby. How to See a Work of Art in Total Darkness. MIT Press, 2010.

In text citation:

(English)

 

APA7:

End text reference:

English, D. (2010). How to see a work of art in total darkness. MIT Press.

In text citation:

(English, 2010)

 

Chicago Manual Style:

End text reference:

English, Darby. How to See a Work of Art in Total Darkness. MIT Press, 2010.

In text citation:

Darby English, How to See a Work of Art in Total Darkness (MIT Press, 2010), pp. 11.